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Contents:
  1. JEREMIAH TUBBS, THE NORTHERN LINES
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Returning home, he was again elected to Congress from the Eighteenth District, but was defeated for re-election, in , by William S. Forman, Democrat. Murphy, the Republican nominee, serving until March 3, He then started a store at New Milford, which he managed for three years, when he sold out on account of his health and began farming. In he came west and purchased a considerable tract of Government land in La Salle County, where the village of Farm Ridge is now situated, removing thither with his family the following year.

He served as Justice of the Peace for fourteen consecutive terms, as Postmaster twenty years and as a member of the Board of Supervisors of La Salle County six years. In he was elected as a Republican to the House of Representatives, was re-elected to the same office in , and to the State Senate in , serving two years. He was also appointed, in , a member of the first Board of Public Charities, serving as President of the Board. Died, Nov. He was settled as a Congregationalist minister at Vandalia for two years, and was active in procuring the charter of Illinois College at Jacksonville, of which he was a Trustee from its organization to his death.

He served for a number of years, from , as Agent of the Home Missionary Society for Illinois, and, in , became the first Principal of Monticello Female Seminary, near Alton, which he conducted five years. Died at Orange, N. He located at La Porte, Ind. Ballard served several years as one of the Commissioners of Cook County, and, from to , as Alder — man of the City of Chicago, and again in the latter office, Died June 27, Ignatius, at Chicago, and at Lavalle University, Montreal, and was ordained a priest in , and consecrated Bishop in His diocesan administration was successful, but regarded by his priests as somewhat arbitrary.

He wrote numerous pastoral letters and brochures for the guidance of clergy and laity. Died at Alton, Feb. It was constructed by two companies, the section from Cincinnati to the Indiana and Illinois State line being known as the Eastern Division, and that in Illinois as the Western Division, the gauge, as originally built, being six feet, but reduced in to standard. Louis and San Francisco, were the principal financial backers of the enterprise. The line was completed and opened for traffic, May 1, In November, , the road was again placed in the hands of a receiver, but was restored to the Company in Several branches of the main line in Indiana and Ohio go to increase the aggregate mileage, but being wholly outside of Illinois are not taken into account in this statement.

Returning east in , he engaged in teaching for two years at Springfield, Mass. In he began practice, was elected a Judge of the Circuit Court in ; served one session as State Senator ; in was appointed Circuit Judge to fill the unexpired term of Judge Richmond, deceased, and, in , was appointed by President Grant United States District Attorney for the Northern District, remaining in office four years.

After retiring from the office of District Attorney in , he removed to Chicago, where he was engaged in practice until his death, June 23, Clair County, Ill. In he was elected to the State Senate from Washington County, serving four years, and at the session of was one of those who voted against the Convention resolution which had for its object to make Illinois a slave State. He subsequently removed to Iowa Territory, but died, in , while visiting a son-in-law in Wisconsin.

He was followed, about , by Revs. David Badgley and Joseph Chance, who organized the first Baptist church within the limits of the State. Five churches, having four ministers and members, formed an association in Several causes, among them a difference of views on the slavery question, resulted in the division of the denomination into factions.

Of these perhaps the most numerous was the Regular or Missionary Baptists, at the head of which was Rev. Peck, a resident of the State from until his death By the sect had grown, until it had some churches, with about 7, members. These were under the ecclesiastical care of twenty-two Associations. Allen B. Freeman organized the first Baptist society in what was then an infant settlement. By the number of Associations had grown to forty, with churches, ministers and 88, members. A Baptist Theological Seminary was for some time supported at Morgan Park, but, in , was absorbed by the University of Chicago, becoming the divinity school of that institution.

At 11 years of age he accompanied his family to Wisconsin, of which State he was a resident until After graduating at the State University of Wisconsin, at Madison, he studied law at the Albany Law School, and was admitted to practice. After serving one term as District Attorney of his county in Wisconsin , and Assistant Attorney-General of the State for , in the latter year he came to Chicago and, in , was elected to Congress by the Republicans of the old Second Illinois District. Population , BARNSBACK, George Frederick Julius , pioneer, was born in Germany, July 25, ; came to Philadelphia in , and soon after to Kentucky, where he became an overseer; two or three years later visited his native country, suffering shipwreck en route in the English Channel; returned to Kentucky in , remaining until , when he removed to what is now Madison then a part of St.

Francois County, Mo. Subsequently becoming disgusted with slavery, he manumitted his slaves and returned to Illinois, locating on a farm near Edwardsville, where he resided until his death in Barnsback served as Representative in the Fourteenth General Assembly and, after returning from Springfield, distributed his salary among the poor of Madison County. Barnsback , his son, was born in St. When he was but two years old his family removed to St. His preliminary education was obtained at Belleville, Ill. After leaving the institution last named at the end of the sophomore year, he taught school at Belleville, still pursuing his classical studies.

In he was admitted to the bar at Belleville, and soon afterward opened an office at Chester, where, for a time, he held the office of Master in Chancery. He removed to Chicago in , and, in , was elevated to the bench of the Cook County Circuit Court. At the expiration of his term he resumed private practice. After attending the common schools, he acquired a higher education at Augusta, Ky.

He was admitted to the bar in his native State, but began the practice of law in Fulton County, Ill. In he received the Republican nomination for Congress and was elected, representing his district from to , at the conclusion of his term retiring to private life. Died at Canton, Ill. It has banks, a local paper, several cheese factories and a milk-bottling plant. In he went to Kansas, where he spent two and a half years in missionary and educational work.

Later, he was appointed Professorial Lecturer on Comparative Religions, under lectureships in connection with the University of Chicago endowed by Mrs. Caroline E. One of these, established in Dr. Courses were delivered at the University in , and, in order to carry out the purposes of the foreign lectureship, Dr. Barrows found it necessary to resign his pastorate, which he did in the spring of Barrows was accompanied by a party of personal friends from Chicago and elsewhere, the tour embracing visits to the principal cities of Southern Europe, Egypt, Palestine, China and Japan, with a somewhat protracted stay in India during the winter of After his return to the United States he lectured at the University of Chicago and in many of the principal cities of the country, on the moral and religious condition of Oriental nations, but, in , was offered the Presidency of Oberlin College, Ohio, which he accepted, entering upon his duties early in Died June 3, The surrounding country is agricultural.

The city contains flouring mills, pork-packing plant, a large creamery; also has two local papers, two banks, three churches and a high school, besides schools of lower grade. Population , 1,; , 1,; , 1, Flavel, D. In he became pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Chicago, remaining until , when he assumed the pastorship of the First Presbyterian Church at Galesburg, this relation continuing until From he served for a considerable period as a member of the Executive Committee of the Illinois Home Missionary Society; was also prominent in educational work, being one of the founders and, for over twenty-five years, an officer of the Chicago Theological Seminary, a Trustee of Knox College and one of the founders and a Trustee of Beloit College, Wis.

JEREMIAH TUBBS, THE NORTHERN LINES

Bascom died at Princeton, Ill. The city has fine water-works supplied from an artesian well, electric lighting plant, electric street car lines with interurban connections, two weekly papers, eight churches, two public schools, and private hospital for insane women. Population , 3,; , 4, Having contemplated entering the Christian ministry, he spent the following year at Lane Theological Seminary, but was compelled to withdraw on account of failing health, when he gave a year to travel.

He then entered upon his life-work as a teacher by engaging as Principal of an English and Classical School in St. Louis, remaining there two years, when he accepted the Professorship of Mathematics in St. Charles College, at St. Charles, Mo. Returning to Jacksonville, Ill. Here he remained seven years, during four of them discharging the duties of County Superintendent of Schools for Morgan County. In the fall of he became Principal of Jacksonville Female Academy, but the following year was elected State Superintendent of Public Instruction, having been nominated for the office by the Republican State Convention of , which put Abraham Lincoln in nomination for the United States Senate.

By successive re-elections he continued in this office fourteen years, serving continuously from to , except two years , as the result of his defeat for re-election in During his incumbency the Illinois common school system was developed and brought to the state of efficiency which it has so well maintained. This volume has been recognized by the courts, and is still regarded as authoritative on the subjects to which it relates.

Bateman was offered and accepted the Presidency of Knox College at Galesburg, remaining until , when he voluntarily tendered his resignation. This, after having been repeatedly urged upon the Board, was finally accepted; but that body immediately, and by unanimous vote, appointed him President Emeritus and Professor of Mental and Moral Science, under which he continued to discharge his duties as a special lecturer as his health enabled him to do so. During his incumbency as President of Knox College, he twice received a tender of the Presidency of Iowa State University and the Chancellorship of two other important State institutions.

He also served, by appointment of successive Governors between and , as a member of the State Board of Health, for four years of this period being President of the Board.

In February, , Dr. Never of a very strong physique, which was rather weakened by his privations while a student and his many years of close confinement to mental labor, towards the close of his life Dr. The event produced the most profound sorrow, not only among his associates in the Faculty and among the students of Knox College, but a large number of friends throughout the State, who had known him officially or personally, and had learned to admire his many noble and beautiful traits of character.

His funeral, which occurred at Galesburg on Oct. Almost the last labors performed by Dr. Bateman were in the revision of matter for this volume, in which he manifested the deepest interest from the time of his assumption of the duties of its Editor-in-Chief. At the time of his death he had the satisfaction of knowing that his work in this field was practically complete.

Bateman had been twice married, first in to Miss Sarah Dayton of Jacksonville, who died in , and a second time in October, , to Miss Annie N. Tyler, of Massachusetts but for some time a teacher in Jacksonville Female Academy , who died, May 28, Bateman by his first marriage, was born at Jacksonville, March 7, , graduated at Amherst College and later from the law department of Columbia College, New York, afterwards prosecuting his studies at Berlin, Heidelberg and Paris, finally becoming Professor of Administrative Law and Government in Columbia College — a position especially created for him.

He had filled this position a little over one year when his career — which was one of great promise — was cut short by death, Feb. Three daughters of Dr. Bateman survive — all the wives of clergymen. Died in Chicago, Oct. When 8 years of age he was brought by his father to Ohio, where the latter soon afterward died.

For several years he lived with an uncle, preparing himself for college and earning money by teaching and manual labor. He graduated from Williams College, Mass. In he removed to Centralia, Ill. For fifteen months he was a prisoner of war, escaping from Libby Prison only to be recaptured and later exposed to the fire of the Union batteries at Morris Island, Charleston harbor.

In he was elected to the Legislature, and, in , State Treasurer, being re-elected to the latter office under the new Constitution of , and serving until January, Died at Minneapolis, Minn. From to , he practiced law in Chicago; the latter year was appointed District Attorney for Utah, serving two years, in removing to Denver, Colo. Bates was an orator of much reputation, and was selected to express the thanks of the citizens of Chicago to Gen.

Sweet, commandant of Camp Douglas, after the detection and defeat of the Camp Douglas conspiracy in November, — a duty which he performed in an address of great eloquence. At an early day he married the widow of Dr. Alexander Wolcott, for a number of years previous to Indian Agent at Chicago, his wife being a daughter of John Kinzie, the first white settler of Chicago. Louis Railway, 8 miles south of Havana. Population , ; , ; , He served for some time as Superintendent of Schools for the city of Sterling, afterwards served as Principal of the Township High School until , when he was elected State Superintendent of Public Instruction and re-elected in , serving two consecutive terms.

In he went to the locality of the present city of Beardstown, and later established there the first ferry across the Illinois River. In , in conjunction with Enoch March of Morgan County, he entered the land on which Beardstown was platted in Died, at Beardstown, in November, It is miles north of St. Louis and 90 miles south of Peoria. Thomas Beard, for whom the town was named, settled here about and soon afterwards established the first ferry across the Illinois River. In the land was patented by Beard and Enoch March, and the town platted, and, during the Black Hawk War of , it became a principal base of supplies for the Illinois volunteers.

The city has six churches and three schools including a high school , two banks and two daily newspapers. Several branches of manufacturing are carried on here — flouring and saw mills, cooperage works, extensive fishing and packing interests, two button factories, one shoe factory, large machine shops, and others of less importance. BEAUBIEN, Jean Baptiste , the second permanent settler on the site of Chicago, was born at Detroit in , became clerk of a fur-trader on Grand River, married an Ottawa woman for his first wife, and, in , had a trading-post at Milwaukee, which he maintained until Ho visited Chicago as early as , bought a cabin there soon after the Fort Dearborn massacre of , married the daughter of Francis La Framboise, a French trader, and, in , became agent of the American Fur Company, having charge of trading posts at Mackinaw and elsewhere.

Out of the ownership of this building grew his claim to the right, in , to enter seventy-five acres of land belonging to the Fort Dearborn reservation. The claim was allowed by the Land Office officials and sustained by the State courts, but disallowed by the Supreme Court of the United States after long litigation. An attempt was made to revive this claim in Congress in , but it was reported upon adversely by a Senate Committee of which the late Senator Thomas F.

Bayard was chairman. Beaubien was evidently a man of no little prominence in his day. In he removed to Nashville, Tenn. Beaubien, was born in Detroit in , came to Chicago in , and bought a log house of James Kinzie, in which he kept a hotel for some time. He also engaged in merchandising, but was not successful, ran the first ferry across the South Branch of the Chicago River, and served for many years as lighthouse keeper at Chicago.

About the Indians transferred to him a reservation of acres of land on the Calumet, for which, some forty years afterwards, he received a patent which had been signed by Martin Van Buren — he having previously been ignorant of its existence. He was married twice and had a family of twenty-two children. Died, at Kankakee, His first wife was a white woman, from whom he separated, afterwards marrying an Indian woman. He left Illinois with the Pottawatomies in , resided at Council Bluffs and, later, in Kansas, being for many years the official interpreter of the tribe and, for some time, one of six Commissioners employed by the Indians to look after their affairs with the United States Government.

In he accompanied his father to his farm on the Des Plaines, but returned to Chicago in , and for years past has been employed on the Chicago police force. Died at Rockford, Oct. A daughter of Governor Bebb married Hon. John P. Early in the Civil War he enlisted in the Twelfth Missouri regiment, and, at the battle of Pea Ridge, was so severely wounded that it was found necessary to amputate one of his legs. In he was elected Sheriff of St. Clair County, and, from to , he served as clerk of the St. Clair Circuit Court.

He also served several terms as a City Councilman of Belleville. In he was elected State Treasurer on the Republican ticket. Died Jan. He read law and was admitted to the bar in St. Albans, Vt. In he removed to Chicago, and, in January, , was appointed by Governor Yates a Justice of the Supreme Court, to fill the five remaining months of the unexpired term of Judge Caton, who had resigned. On retiring from the bench he resumed private practice. Died, August 18, Beckwith, a pioneer settler of Eastern Illinois and one of the founders of the city of Danville, was a native of Wyalusing, Pa.

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In , the senior Beckwith, in company with his brother George, descended the Ohio River, afterwards ascending the Wabash to where Terre Haute now stands, but finally locating in what is now a part of Edgar County, Ill. A year later he removed to the vicinity of the present site of the city of Danville. In connection with Guy W.

He died in Hiram, the subject of this sketch, thus left fatherless at less than three years of age, received only such education as was afforded in the common schools of that period. He continued in their office and, on the removal of Lamon to Bloomington in , he succeeded to the business of the firm at Danville. Lamon — who, on Mr. Beckwith by a second marriage of the mother of the latter. While engaged in the practice of his profession, Mr. In he was appointed by Governor Fifer a member of the first Board of Trustees of the Illinois State Historical Library, serving until the expiration of his term in, , and was re-appointed to the same position by Governor Tanner in , in each case being chosen President of the Board.

Having taken a course in the Ohio Wesleyan University at Delaware, in he removed to Illinois, locating at Fairfield, Wayne County, and began the study of law in the office of his brother, Edwin Beecher, being admitted to practice in In he united with others in the organization of the Illinois Southeastern Railroad projected from Shawneetown to Edgewood on the Illinois Central in Effingham County. This line — which Mr.

Beecher was appointed receiver of the road, and, for a time, had control of its operation as agent for the bondholders. Beecher became General Counsel of the controlling corporation, so remaining until His later home was in Cincinnati, although for over a quarter of a century. In politics Mr. Beecher had always been a Republican, and was one of the few in Wayne County who voted for Fremont in , and for Lincoln in He was also a member of the Republican State Central Committee of Illinois from for a period of ten or twelve years.

Died April 11, In he returned to Illinois as pastor of the First Congregational Church at Galesburg, continuing until , when he removed to Brooklyn, where he resided without pastoral charge, except , when he was pastor of the Parkville Congregational Church. While President of Illinois College, that institution was exposed to much hostile criticism on account of his outspoken opposition to slavery, as shown by his participation in founding the first Illinois State Anti-Slavery Society and his eloquent denunciation of the murder of Elijah P.

Next to his brother Henry Ward, he was probably the most powerful orator belonging to that gifted family, and, in connection with his able associates in the faculty of the Illinois College, assisted to give that institution a wide reputation as a nursery of independent thought. Died in Brooklyn, July 28, Stephen R.

His father, who was opposed to slavery, moved to Kentucky in , but remained there only two years, when he removed to Clark County, Ind. In he was appointed to Chicago, but the Black Hawk War coming on immediately thereafter, he retired to Plainfield. Later he traveled various circuits in Illinois, until , when he was superannuated, occupying his time thereafter in writing reminiscences of his early history.

In Mr. Beidler retired from the lumber trade, investing largely in west side real estate in the city of Chicago, which appreciated rapidly in value, making him one of the most wealthy real estate owners in Chicago. Died, March 16, Beidler retired from business in , devoting his attention to large real estate investments. He was a liberal contributor to religious, educational and benevolent institutions. Died in Chicago, March 15, McCook, and taking part in the Atlanta and Nashville campaigns.

While a prisoner in the hands of the rebels he was placed under fire of the Union batteries at Charleston. Coming to Chicago in , he served as Principal in various public schools, including the North Division High School. He was one of the earliest advocates of manual training, and, on the establishment of the Chicago Manual Training School in , was appointed its Director — a position which he has continued to occupy.

During he made a trip to Europe by appointment of the Government, to investigate the school systems in European countries. Belknap, for some time Secretary of War under President Grant. After attending the public schools of his native city, he took a course at Adams Academy, Quincy, Mass. He never held any political position until nominated as a Republican for the Fifty-fourth Congress, in the strongly Democratic Third District of Chicago.

Although the returns showed a plurality of thirty-one votes for his Democratic opponent Lawrence McGann , a recount proved him elected, when, Mr. McGann having voluntarily withdrawn, Mr. Belknap was unanimously awarded the seat. In he was re-elected from a District usually strongly Democratic, receiving a plurality of votes, but was defeated by his Democratic opponent in , retiring from Congress, March 3, , when he received an appointment as Paymaster in the Army from President McKinley, with the rank of Major.

After graduation he opened an office at Fairfield, Wayne County, but, in , returned to Mount Carmel and from was the partner of Judge E. Bell was appointed County Judge of Lawrence County, being elected to the same office in Louis line, and secured the construction of the division from Princeton, Ind.

Clair County, a city and railroad center, 14 miles south of east from St. It is one of the oldest towns in the State, having been selected as the county-seat in and platted in It lies in the center of a rich agricultural and coal-bearing district and contains numerous factories, including agricultural implements, flouring mills, a nail mill, glass works and shoe factories. It has five newspaper establishments, of which four issue both daily and weekly editions.

Its commercial and educational facilities are exceptionally good. Its population is largely of German descent. Population , 15,; , 17,, , 21, Louis Consolidated Railroad. It was chartered Feb. Louis to Belleville. The corporate office is at Belleville. See St. At Duquoin it connects with the Illinois Central and forms a short line between St.

Louis and Cairo. Louis Railway, 9 miles west of Mount Carmel. Population , ; , ; , ; , Its total trackage all of standard gauge and laid with pound steel rails is Paul Junction, It has no funded debt. The city has twelve churches, five graded schools, and three banks two national. One daily and one semi-weekly paper are published here.

Belvidere also has very considerable manufacturing interests, including manufactories of sewing machines, bicycles, automobiles, besides a large milk-condensing factory and two creameries. BEMENT , a village in Piatt County, at intersection of main line and Chicago Division of Wabash Railroad, 20 miles east of Decatur and miles south-southwest of Chicago; in agricultural and stock-raising district; has three grain elevators, broom factory, water-works, electric-light plant, four churches, two banks and a weekly paper.

The first public office held by Mr. Benjamin was that of Delegate to the State Constitutional Convention of , in which he took a prominent part in shaping the provisions of the new Constitution relating to corporations. In he was chosen County Judge of McLean County, by repeated re-elections holding the position until , when he resumed private practice. For more than twenty years he has been connected with the law department of Wesleyan University at Bloomington, a part of the time being Dean of the Faculty; is also the author of several volumes of legal textbooks.

Its first sessions were held in two large rooms; its faculty consisted of seven professors, and there were thirty matriculates. More commodious quarters were secured the following year, and a still better home after the fire of , in which all the college property was destroyed. Another change of location was made in In the property then owned was sold and a new college building, in connection with a hospital, erected in a more quiet quarter of the city. A free dispensary is conducted by the college. The teaching faculty consists of nineteen professors, with four assistants and demonstrators.

Women are admitted as pupils on equal terms with men. Pension Agent. Cent, and Chi.

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His father, James Berdan, Sr. Thirteen years later his son, the subject of this sketch, came to the same region, and Jacksonville became his home for the remainder of his life. Berdan was a well-read lawyer, as well as a man of high principle and sound culture, with pure literary and social tastes. Although possessing unusual capabilities, his refinement of character and dislike of ostentation made him seek rather the association and esteem of friends than public office. In he was elected County Judge of Morgan County, serving by a second election until In the latter years of his life he was, for a considerable period, the law partner of ex-Governor and ex-Senator Richard Yates.

Judge Berdan was the ardent political friend and admirer of Abraham Lincoln, as well as an intimate friend and frequent correspondent of the poet Longfellow, besides being the correspondent, during a long period of his life, of a number of other prominent literary men. Pierre Irving, the nephew and biographer of Washington Irving, was his brother-in-law through the marriage of a favorite sister. Judge Berdan died at Jacksonville, August 24, John G. Died, at Springfield, Jan. He was for many years the very able and efficient President of the Covenant Mutual Life Association of Illinois, and is now its Treasurer.

He labored among the Tamaroas, being in charge of the mission at Cahokia from to his death in Berry presided over the Republican State Convention of , the same year was a candidate for re-election to the State Senate, but the certificate was awarded to his Democratic competitor, who was declared elected by plurality. On a contest before the Senate at the first session of the Fortieth General Assembly, the seat was awarded to Mr.

Berry on the ground of illegality in the rulings of the Secretary of State affecting the vote of his opponent. William W. His home being then in Covington, he studied law in Cincinnati, and, at the age of 23, began practice at Louisville, Ky. Early in he entered the Civil War on the Union side as Major of the Louisville Legion, and subsequently served in the Army of the Cumberland, marching to the sea with Sherman and, during the period of his service, receiving four wounds.

After the close of the war he was offered the position of Governor of one of the Territories, but, determining not to go further west than Illinois, declined. For three years he was located and in practice at Winchester, Ill. He always took a warm interest in politics and, in local affairs, was a leader of his party. He was an organizer of the G. He was frequently urged by his party friends to run for public office, but it was so much against his nature to ask for even one vote, that he would not consent.

He died at his home in Quincy, much regretted, May 6, Died, in Washington, May 14, , while prosecuting a claim against the Government for the construction of gunboats during the war. Railroad, 18 miles southeast of Decatur; in farming district; has one newspaper and four churches. Mary McKee Homes, who conducted it for some twenty years, until her death. Its report for shows a faculty of ten instructors and pupils.

Its course of instruction embraces the preparatory and classical branches, together with music, oratory and fine arts. His later years were spent in superintending a large dairy farm near Sandwich, De Kalb County, where he died in January, Having been admitted to the bar, he returned to Illinois in , first locating at Sycamore, but three years later established himself in Chicago.

During the first year of the war he assisted to raise the Eighth Regiment Illinois Cavalry, and was commissioned first as Captain and still later Major; two years later became Colonel of the Seventeenth Cavalry, which he commanded to the close of the war, being mustered out, February, , with the rank of brevet Brigadier-General. After the war he held the office of Sheriff of Cook County four years; in was elected to the State Senate, and, in the following year, Congressman-at-large to succeed General Logan, elected to the United States Senate; resigned this office in January, , having been elected Lieutenant-Governor, and a few weeks later succeeded to the governorship by the election of Governor Oglesby to the United States Senate.

His last home was near Los Angeles, Cal. He had several brothers, a number of whom played important parts in the early history of the province. Bienville first visited Louisiana, in company with his brother Iberville, in , their object being to establish a French colony near the mouth of the Mississippi. The first settlement was made at Biloxi, Dec. The latter was afterward made Governor of Louisiana, and, at his death , he was succeeded by Bienville, who transferred the seat of government to Mobile.

In he was joined by his brother Chateaugay, who brought seventeen settlers from Canada. Soon afterwards Iberville died, and Bienville was recalled to France in , but was reinstated the following year. Finding the Indians worthless as tillers of the soil, he seriously suggested to the home government the expediency of trading off the copper-colored aborigines for negroes from the West Indies, three Indians to be reckoned as equivalent to two blacks.

The two quarreled. The latter soon after founded New Orleans, which became the seat of government for the province which then included Illinois , in In January, , he was again summoned to France to answer charges; was removed in disgrace in , but reinstated in and given the rank of Lieutenant-General. Failing in various expeditions against the Chickasaw Indians, he was again superseded in , returning to France, where he died in He settled in Bellefontaine now Monroe County soon after the close of the war.

He was Sheriff of St. He also represented his county in the Territorial Legislatures of Indiana and Illinois. Died, in St. Clair County, in It runs south and southwest through Franklin and Jackson Counties, and enters the Mississippi about five miles below Grand Tower. Its length is estimated at miles. Later he was proprietor for a time of the mail stage-coach line between Concord, N. Paul Railway and became identified with the business interests of Chicago.

Billings became extensively interested in the street railway enterprises of Mr. Holmes, resulting in his becoming the proprietor of the street railway system at Memphis, Tenn. In early life he had been associated with Commodore Vanderbilt in the operation of the Hudson River steamboat lines of the latter. In addition to his other business enterprises, he was principal owner and, during the last twenty-five years of his life, President of the Home National and Home Savings Banks of Chicago.

Died, Feb. He then removed to St. Louis, Mo. In he was elected a Delegate from Madison County to the State Constitutional Convention of , but died before the expiration of the session, on April 19, He purchased a large tract of land and induced a large colony of English artisans, laborers and farmers to settle upon the same, founding the town of New Albion. He was an active, uncompromising opponent of slavery, and was an important factor in defeating the scheme to make Illinois a slave State.

He was appointed Secretary of State by Governor Coles in October, , but resigned at the end of three months, a hostile Legislature having refused to confirm him. A strong writer and a frequent contributor to the press, his letters and published works attracted attention both in this country and in Europe. Died from drowning in , aged about 63 years. See Slavery and Slave Laws. In he was elected a Representative in the General Assembly, where he soon attained high rank as a debater. He studied law and practiced in Belleville, St.

Clair County, becoming Prosecuting Attorney for that county in He represented Illinois in Congress from to , being first elected as an Independent Democrat. On the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Bill, he left the Democratic party and, in , was elected Governor on the Republican ticket. While in Congress he was challenged by Jefferson Davis after an interchange of heated words respecting the relative courage of Northern and Southern soldiers, spoken in debate.

Bissell accepted the challenge, naming muskets at thirty paces. Died in office, at Springfield, Ill. Black received the honorary degree of A. Civil Service Commission, and chosen its President. It owes its origin to the efforts of Dr. The enterprise lay dormant for many years, and it was not until that the institution was formally incorporated, and ten years later it was little more than a high school, giving one course of instruction considered particularly adapted to prospective students of theology.

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At present there are about students in attendance, a faculty of twelve instructors, and a theological, as well as preparatory and collegiate departments. It is also claimed that he was born on Rock River, as well as within the present limits of Hancock County.

Conceiving that his people had been wrongfully despoiled of lands belonging to them, in he inaugurated what is commonly known as the Black Hawk War. He was ambitious, but susceptible to flattery, and while having many of the qualities of leadership, was lacking in moral force. He was always attached to British interests, and unquestionably received British aid of a substantial sort. After his defeat he was made the ward of Keokuk, another Chief, which humiliation of his pride broke his heart. He died on a reservation set apart for him in Iowa, in , aged His body is said to have been exhumed nine months after death, and his articulated skeleton is alleged to have been preserved in the rooms of the Burlington Ia.

Historical Society until , when it was destroyed by fire. See also Black Hawk War: Appendix. While thus employed he applied himself diligently to the study of the theoretical science of engineering, and, on coming to Illinois in , was qualified to accept and fill the position of division engineer from Bloomington to Dixon on the Illinois Central Railway. Blackstone then became a Director in the latter organization and, in April following, was chosen its President.

This office he filled uninterruptedly until April 1, , when the road passed into the hands of a syndicate of other lines. He was also one of the original incorporators of the Union Stock Yards Company, and was its President from to His career as a railroad man was conspicuous for its long service, the uninterrupted success of his management of the enterprises entrusted to his hands and his studious regard for the interests of stockholders.

Died, May 21, He belonged to a prominent family in the early history of the State, his father, David Blackwell, who was also a lawyer and settled in Belleville about , having been a member of the Second General Assembly from St. Clair County, and also of the Fourth and Fifth. He finally died in Belleville. Robert Blackwell, a brother of David and the uncle of the subject of this sketch, was joint owner with Daniel P. Robert S. He later studied law with Hon. Browning at Quincy, beginning practice at Rushville, where he was associated for a time with Judge Minshall.

In he removed to Chicago, having for his first partner Corydon Beckwith, afterwards of the Supreme Court, still later being associated with a number of prominent lawyers of that day. The next year he purchased the stock and continued the business on his own account. In August, , he removed to Chicago, where he established the earliest and one of the most extensive wholesale hardware concerns in that city, with which he remained connected nearly fifty years. During this period he was associated with various partners, including C. Nelson, E. Hall, O. Belden, James H.

Horton and others, besides, at times, conducting the business alone. He suffered by the fire of in common with other business men of Chicago, but promptly resumed business and, within the next two or three years, had erected business blocks, successively, on Lake and Randolph Streets, but retired from business in Died in Chicago, May 10, He engaged in journalism at Rochester, Minn. Paul Pioneer Press. Blakely was President of the Blakely Printing Company, of Chicago, also conducting a large printing business in New York, which was his residence.

This settlement, of which the present town of Marine first called Madison was the outcome, took its name from the fact that several of the early settlers, like Captain Blakeman, were sea-faring men. Captain Blakeman became a prominent citizen and represented Madison County in the lower branch of the Third and Fourth General Assemblies and , in the former being one of the opponents of the pro-slavery amendment of the Constitution. In he assumed the Presidency of Knox College at Galesburg, remaining until , during his connection with that institution doing much to increase its capacity and resources.

It is a shipping point for the grain grown in the surrounding country, and has a grain elevator and steam flour and saw mills. It also has banks, one weekly newspaper and several churches. Daniel Brainard in founding Rush Medical College at Chicago, for a time filling three chairs in that institution; also, for a time, occupied the chair of Chemistry and Natural Philosophy in Northwestern University. Died, Dec. John Blatchford, was born at Stillwater, N.

He prepared for college at Lansingburg Academy. New York, and at Marion College, Mo. After graduating, he was employed for several years in the law offices of his uncles, R. Blatchford, New York. For considerations of health he returned to the West, and, in , engaged in business for himself as a lead manufacturer in St. After a few years the firm was dissolved, Mr. Blatchford taking the Chicago business, which has continued as E.

While Mr. Blatchford has invariably declined political offices, he has been recognized as a staunch Republican, and the services of few men have been in more frequent request for positions of trust in connection with educational and benevolent enterprises. Williams, of Chicago. In the giving of time and money for Christian, educational and benevolent enterprises, he has been conspicuous for his generosity, and noted for his valuable counsel and executive ability in carrying these enterprises to success. He finished his theological course at Princeton, N. In he came to the West, spending the following winter at Jacksonville, Ill.

His death occurred in St. Louis, April 8, The churches he served testified strongly to Dr. Then, having studied theology, he served for several years as rector of Episcopal churches in Ohio. In he settled at Springfield, Ill. Later he became Professor of Mathematics, first in the University of Mississippi, and in the University of Virginia. Later he became a minister of the Methodist Church. He gained considerable reputation for eloquence during his residence in Illinois, and was the author of a number of works on religious and political subjects, the latter maintaining the right of secession; was a man of recognized ability, but lacked stability of character.

Died at Alexandria, Va. At the age of 10 years he removed with his parents to Illinois, where he attended the district schools, later returning to Amherst to spend a year at the Academy. Returning home, he spent the years in teaching and surveying. In he began the study of law at Chicago, being admitted to the bar in , and beginning practice at Waukegan, Ill. In he was elected to the lower house of the Legislature from Lake County, as an anti-slavery candidate, and, in , to the State Senate, in the latter serving four years.

Of the second named road he was one of the projectors, procuring its charter, and being identified with it in the several capacities of Attorney, Director and President. This position he continued to occupy for twenty-two years, resigning it in to accept an appointment by President Cleveland as one of the counsel for the United States before the Behring Sea Arbitrators at Paris, bis last official service.

Died Feb. Besides car shops and repair works employing some 2, hands, there are manufactories of stoves, furnaces, plows, flour, etc. Nurseries are numerous in the vicinity and horse breeding receives muoh attention. The city is the seat of Illinois Wesleyan University, has fine public schools, several newspapers two published daily , besides educational and other publications.

The business section suffered a disastrous fire in , but has been rebuilt more substantially than before. Although not formally called as such, this was the first Republican State Convention held in Illinois, out of which grew a permanent Republican organization in the State. The Bloomington Convention of met in accordance with a call issued by a State Central Committee appointed by the Convention of Anti-Nebraska editors held at Decatur on February 22, See Anti-Nebraska Editorial Convention.

The Convention met on May 29, , the date designated by the Editorial Convention at Decatur, but was rather in the nature of a mass than a delegate convention, as party organizations existed in few counties of the State at that time. Consequently representation was very unequal and followed no systematic rule. Out of one hundred counties into which the State was then divided, only seventy were represented by delegates, ranging from one to twenty-five each, leaving thirty counties embracing nearly the whole of the southern part of the State entirely unrepresented.

Lee County had the largest representation twenty-five , Morgan County the home of Richard Yates coming next with twenty delegates, while Cook County had seventeen and Sangamon had five. The whole number of delegates, as shown by the contemporaneous record, was Browning, Richard Yates, John M.

Palmer, Owen Lovejoy, Norman B. Judd, Burton C. Cook and others who afterwards became prominent in State politics. Ray and Charles L. The temporary organization was effected with Archibald Williams of Adams County in the chair, followed by the election of John M.

Palmer of Macoupin, as Permanent President. The other officers were: Vice-Presidents — John A. Bryant of Bureau; A. Johns of Macon; D. Marshall of Coles; J. Ruggles of Mason; G. Parks of Will, and John Clark of Schuyler. Secretaries — Henry S. Baker of Madison; Charles L. Hanna of Randolph. A State ticket was put in nomination consisting of William H. Bissell for Governor by acclamation ; Francis A. Powell of Peoria, for Superintendent of Public Instruction. Hoffman, having been found ineligible by lack of residence after the date of naturalization, withdrew, and his place was subsequently filled by the nomination of John Wood of Quincy.

The platform adopted was outspoken in its pledges of unswerving loyalty to the Union and opposition to the extension of slavery into new territory. A delegation was appointed to the National Convention to be held in Philadelphia on June 17, following, and a State Central Committee was named to conduct the State campaign, consisting of James C. Cook of La Salle, and Charles H. Ray and Norman B. Judd of Cook.

He also served several terms as a City Councilman of Belleville. In he was elected State Treasurer on the Republican ticket. Died Jan. He read law and was admitted to the bar in St. Albans, Vt. In he removed to Chicago, and, in January, , was appointed by Governor Yates a Justice of the Supreme Court, to fill the five remaining months of the unexpired term of Judge Caton, who had resigned. On retiring from the bench he resumed private practice. Died, August 18, Beckwith, a pioneer settler of Eastern Illinois and one of the founders of the city of Danville, was a native of Wyalusing, Pa.

In , the senior Beckwith, in company with his brother George, descended the Ohio River, afterwards ascending the Wabash to where Terre Haute now stands, but finally locating in what is now a part of Edgar County, Ill. A year later he removed to the vicinity of the present site of the city of Danville. In connection with Guy W. He died in Hiram, the subject of this sketch, thus left fatherless at less than three years of age, received only such education as was afforded in the common schools of that period.

He continued in their office and, on the removal of Lamon to Bloomington in , he succeeded to the business of the firm at Danville. Lamon — who, on Mr. Beckwith by a second marriage of the mother of the latter. While engaged in the practice of his profession, Mr. In he was appointed by Governor Fifer a member of the first Board of Trustees of the Illinois State Historical Library, serving until the expiration of his term in, , and was re-appointed to the same position by Governor Tanner in , in each case being chosen President of the Board.

Having taken a course in the Ohio Wesleyan University at Delaware, in he removed to Illinois, locating at Fairfield, Wayne County, and began the study of law in the office of his brother, Edwin Beecher, being admitted to practice in In he united with others in the organization of the Illinois Southeastern Railroad projected from Shawneetown to Edgewood on the Illinois Central in Effingham County. This line — which Mr. Beecher was appointed receiver of the road, and, for a time, had control of its operation as agent for the bondholders.

Beecher became General Counsel of the controlling corporation, so remaining until His later home was in Cincinnati, although for over a quarter of a century. In politics Mr. Beecher had always been a Republican, and was one of the few in Wayne County who voted for Fremont in , and for Lincoln in He was also a member of the Republican State Central Committee of Illinois from for a period of ten or twelve years. Died April 11, In he returned to Illinois as pastor of the First Congregational Church at Galesburg, continuing until , when he removed to Brooklyn, where he resided without pastoral charge, except , when he was pastor of the Parkville Congregational Church.

While President of Illinois College, that institution was exposed to much hostile criticism on account of his outspoken opposition to slavery, as shown by his participation in founding the first Illinois State Anti-Slavery Society and his eloquent denunciation of the murder of Elijah P. Next to his brother Henry Ward, he was probably the most powerful orator belonging to that gifted family, and, in connection with his able associates in the faculty of the Illinois College, assisted to give that institution a wide reputation as a nursery of independent thought.

Died in Brooklyn, July 28, Stephen R. His father, who was opposed to slavery, moved to Kentucky in , but remained there only two years, when he removed to Clark County, Ind. In he was appointed to Chicago, but the Black Hawk War coming on immediately thereafter, he retired to Plainfield. Later he traveled various circuits in Illinois, until , when he was superannuated, occupying his time thereafter in writing reminiscences of his early history.

In Mr. Beidler retired from the lumber trade, investing largely in west side real estate in the city of Chicago, which appreciated rapidly in value, making him one of the most wealthy real estate owners in Chicago. Died, March 16, Beidler retired from business in , devoting his attention to large real estate investments. He was a liberal contributor to religious, educational and benevolent institutions. Died in Chicago, March 15, McCook, and taking part in the Atlanta and Nashville campaigns. While a prisoner in the hands of the rebels he was placed under fire of the Union batteries at Charleston.

Coming to Chicago in , he served as Principal in various public schools, including the North Division High School. He was one of the earliest advocates of manual training, and, on the establishment of the Chicago Manual Training School in , was appointed its Director — a position which he has continued to occupy. During he made a trip to Europe by appointment of the Government, to investigate the school systems in European countries.

Belknap, for some time Secretary of War under President Grant. After attending the public schools of his native city, he took a course at Adams Academy, Quincy, Mass. He never held any political position until nominated as a Republican for the Fifty-fourth Congress, in the strongly Democratic Third District of Chicago. Although the returns showed a plurality of thirty-one votes for his Democratic opponent Lawrence McGann , a recount proved him elected, when, Mr.

McGann having voluntarily withdrawn, Mr. Belknap was unanimously awarded the seat. In he was re-elected from a District usually strongly Democratic, receiving a plurality of votes, but was defeated by his Democratic opponent in , retiring from Congress, March 3, , when he received an appointment as Paymaster in the Army from President McKinley, with the rank of Major. After graduation he opened an office at Fairfield, Wayne County, but, in , returned to Mount Carmel and from was the partner of Judge E. Bell was appointed County Judge of Lawrence County, being elected to the same office in Louis line, and secured the construction of the division from Princeton, Ind.

Clair County, a city and railroad center, 14 miles south of east from St. It is one of the oldest towns in the State, having been selected as the county-seat in and platted in It lies in the center of a rich agricultural and coal-bearing district and contains numerous factories, including agricultural implements, flouring mills, a nail mill, glass works and shoe factories. It has five newspaper establishments, of which four issue both daily and weekly editions. Its commercial and educational facilities are exceptionally good.


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Its population is largely of German descent. Population , 15,; , 17,, , 21, Louis Consolidated Railroad. It was chartered Feb. Louis to Belleville. The corporate office is at Belleville. See St. At Duquoin it connects with the Illinois Central and forms a short line between St. Louis and Cairo. Louis Railway, 9 miles west of Mount Carmel. Population , ; , ; , ; , Its total trackage all of standard gauge and laid with pound steel rails is Paul Junction, It has no funded debt.

The city has twelve churches, five graded schools, and three banks two national. One daily and one semi-weekly paper are published here. Belvidere also has very considerable manufacturing interests, including manufactories of sewing machines, bicycles, automobiles, besides a large milk-condensing factory and two creameries.

BEMENT , a village in Piatt County, at intersection of main line and Chicago Division of Wabash Railroad, 20 miles east of Decatur and miles south-southwest of Chicago; in agricultural and stock-raising district; has three grain elevators, broom factory, water-works, electric-light plant, four churches, two banks and a weekly paper. The first public office held by Mr. Benjamin was that of Delegate to the State Constitutional Convention of , in which he took a prominent part in shaping the provisions of the new Constitution relating to corporations.

In he was chosen County Judge of McLean County, by repeated re-elections holding the position until , when he resumed private practice. For more than twenty years he has been connected with the law department of Wesleyan University at Bloomington, a part of the time being Dean of the Faculty; is also the author of several volumes of legal textbooks. Its first sessions were held in two large rooms; its faculty consisted of seven professors, and there were thirty matriculates.

More commodious quarters were secured the following year, and a still better home after the fire of , in which all the college property was destroyed. Another change of location was made in In the property then owned was sold and a new college building, in connection with a hospital, erected in a more quiet quarter of the city. A free dispensary is conducted by the college.

The teaching faculty consists of nineteen professors, with four assistants and demonstrators. Women are admitted as pupils on equal terms with men. Pension Agent. Cent, and Chi. His father, James Berdan, Sr. Thirteen years later his son, the subject of this sketch, came to the same region, and Jacksonville became his home for the remainder of his life. Berdan was a well-read lawyer, as well as a man of high principle and sound culture, with pure literary and social tastes. Although possessing unusual capabilities, his refinement of character and dislike of ostentation made him seek rather the association and esteem of friends than public office.

In he was elected County Judge of Morgan County, serving by a second election until In the latter years of his life he was, for a considerable period, the law partner of ex-Governor and ex-Senator Richard Yates. Judge Berdan was the ardent political friend and admirer of Abraham Lincoln, as well as an intimate friend and frequent correspondent of the poet Longfellow, besides being the correspondent, during a long period of his life, of a number of other prominent literary men. Pierre Irving, the nephew and biographer of Washington Irving, was his brother-in-law through the marriage of a favorite sister.

Judge Berdan died at Jacksonville, August 24, John G. Died, at Springfield, Jan. He was for many years the very able and efficient President of the Covenant Mutual Life Association of Illinois, and is now its Treasurer. He labored among the Tamaroas, being in charge of the mission at Cahokia from to his death in Berry presided over the Republican State Convention of , the same year was a candidate for re-election to the State Senate, but the certificate was awarded to his Democratic competitor, who was declared elected by plurality.

On a contest before the Senate at the first session of the Fortieth General Assembly, the seat was awarded to Mr. Berry on the ground of illegality in the rulings of the Secretary of State affecting the vote of his opponent. William W. His home being then in Covington, he studied law in Cincinnati, and, at the age of 23, began practice at Louisville, Ky. Early in he entered the Civil War on the Union side as Major of the Louisville Legion, and subsequently served in the Army of the Cumberland, marching to the sea with Sherman and, during the period of his service, receiving four wounds.

After the close of the war he was offered the position of Governor of one of the Territories, but, determining not to go further west than Illinois, declined. For three years he was located and in practice at Winchester, Ill. He always took a warm interest in politics and, in local affairs, was a leader of his party.

He was an organizer of the G. He was frequently urged by his party friends to run for public office, but it was so much against his nature to ask for even one vote, that he would not consent. He died at his home in Quincy, much regretted, May 6, Died, in Washington, May 14, , while prosecuting a claim against the Government for the construction of gunboats during the war.

Railroad, 18 miles southeast of Decatur; in farming district; has one newspaper and four churches. Mary McKee Homes, who conducted it for some twenty years, until her death. Its report for shows a faculty of ten instructors and pupils. Its course of instruction embraces the preparatory and classical branches, together with music, oratory and fine arts.

His later years were spent in superintending a large dairy farm near Sandwich, De Kalb County, where he died in January, Having been admitted to the bar, he returned to Illinois in , first locating at Sycamore, but three years later established himself in Chicago. During the first year of the war he assisted to raise the Eighth Regiment Illinois Cavalry, and was commissioned first as Captain and still later Major; two years later became Colonel of the Seventeenth Cavalry, which he commanded to the close of the war, being mustered out, February, , with the rank of brevet Brigadier-General.

After the war he held the office of Sheriff of Cook County four years; in was elected to the State Senate, and, in the following year, Congressman-at-large to succeed General Logan, elected to the United States Senate; resigned this office in January, , having been elected Lieutenant-Governor, and a few weeks later succeeded to the governorship by the election of Governor Oglesby to the United States Senate. His last home was near Los Angeles, Cal. He had several brothers, a number of whom played important parts in the early history of the province.

Bienville first visited Louisiana, in company with his brother Iberville, in , their object being to establish a French colony near the mouth of the Mississippi. The first settlement was made at Biloxi, Dec. The latter was afterward made Governor of Louisiana, and, at his death , he was succeeded by Bienville, who transferred the seat of government to Mobile. In he was joined by his brother Chateaugay, who brought seventeen settlers from Canada. Soon afterwards Iberville died, and Bienville was recalled to France in , but was reinstated the following year. Finding the Indians worthless as tillers of the soil, he seriously suggested to the home government the expediency of trading off the copper-colored aborigines for negroes from the West Indies, three Indians to be reckoned as equivalent to two blacks.

The two quarreled. The latter soon after founded New Orleans, which became the seat of government for the province which then included Illinois , in In January, , he was again summoned to France to answer charges; was removed in disgrace in , but reinstated in and given the rank of Lieutenant-General. Failing in various expeditions against the Chickasaw Indians, he was again superseded in , returning to France, where he died in He settled in Bellefontaine now Monroe County soon after the close of the war.

He was Sheriff of St. He also represented his county in the Territorial Legislatures of Indiana and Illinois. Died, in St. Clair County, in It runs south and southwest through Franklin and Jackson Counties, and enters the Mississippi about five miles below Grand Tower.

Its length is estimated at miles. Later he was proprietor for a time of the mail stage-coach line between Concord, N. Paul Railway and became identified with the business interests of Chicago. Billings became extensively interested in the street railway enterprises of Mr. Holmes, resulting in his becoming the proprietor of the street railway system at Memphis, Tenn.

In early life he had been associated with Commodore Vanderbilt in the operation of the Hudson River steamboat lines of the latter.


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In addition to his other business enterprises, he was principal owner and, during the last twenty-five years of his life, President of the Home National and Home Savings Banks of Chicago. Died, Feb. He then removed to St. Louis, Mo. In he was elected a Delegate from Madison County to the State Constitutional Convention of , but died before the expiration of the session, on April 19, He purchased a large tract of land and induced a large colony of English artisans, laborers and farmers to settle upon the same, founding the town of New Albion.

He was an active, uncompromising opponent of slavery, and was an important factor in defeating the scheme to make Illinois a slave State. He was appointed Secretary of State by Governor Coles in October, , but resigned at the end of three months, a hostile Legislature having refused to confirm him. A strong writer and a frequent contributor to the press, his letters and published works attracted attention both in this country and in Europe.

Died from drowning in , aged about 63 years. See Slavery and Slave Laws. In he was elected a Representative in the General Assembly, where he soon attained high rank as a debater. He studied law and practiced in Belleville, St. Clair County, becoming Prosecuting Attorney for that county in He represented Illinois in Congress from to , being first elected as an Independent Democrat.

On the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Bill, he left the Democratic party and, in , was elected Governor on the Republican ticket. While in Congress he was challenged by Jefferson Davis after an interchange of heated words respecting the relative courage of Northern and Southern soldiers, spoken in debate. Bissell accepted the challenge, naming muskets at thirty paces.

Died in office, at Springfield, Ill. Black received the honorary degree of A. Civil Service Commission, and chosen its President. It owes its origin to the efforts of Dr. The enterprise lay dormant for many years, and it was not until that the institution was formally incorporated, and ten years later it was little more than a high school, giving one course of instruction considered particularly adapted to prospective students of theology.

At present there are about students in attendance, a faculty of twelve instructors, and a theological, as well as preparatory and collegiate departments. It is also claimed that he was born on Rock River, as well as within the present limits of Hancock County. Conceiving that his people had been wrongfully despoiled of lands belonging to them, in he inaugurated what is commonly known as the Black Hawk War.

He was ambitious, but susceptible to flattery, and while having many of the qualities of leadership, was lacking in moral force. He was always attached to British interests, and unquestionably received British aid of a substantial sort. After his defeat he was made the ward of Keokuk, another Chief, which humiliation of his pride broke his heart. He died on a reservation set apart for him in Iowa, in , aged His body is said to have been exhumed nine months after death, and his articulated skeleton is alleged to have been preserved in the rooms of the Burlington Ia.

Historical Society until , when it was destroyed by fire. See also Black Hawk War: Appendix. While thus employed he applied himself diligently to the study of the theoretical science of engineering, and, on coming to Illinois in , was qualified to accept and fill the position of division engineer from Bloomington to Dixon on the Illinois Central Railway.

Blackstone then became a Director in the latter organization and, in April following, was chosen its President. This office he filled uninterruptedly until April 1, , when the road passed into the hands of a syndicate of other lines. He was also one of the original incorporators of the Union Stock Yards Company, and was its President from to His career as a railroad man was conspicuous for its long service, the uninterrupted success of his management of the enterprises entrusted to his hands and his studious regard for the interests of stockholders.

Died, May 21, He belonged to a prominent family in the early history of the State, his father, David Blackwell, who was also a lawyer and settled in Belleville about , having been a member of the Second General Assembly from St. Clair County, and also of the Fourth and Fifth. He finally died in Belleville. Robert Blackwell, a brother of David and the uncle of the subject of this sketch, was joint owner with Daniel P.

Robert S. He later studied law with Hon. Browning at Quincy, beginning practice at Rushville, where he was associated for a time with Judge Minshall. In he removed to Chicago, having for his first partner Corydon Beckwith, afterwards of the Supreme Court, still later being associated with a number of prominent lawyers of that day. The next year he purchased the stock and continued the business on his own account. In August, , he removed to Chicago, where he established the earliest and one of the most extensive wholesale hardware concerns in that city, with which he remained connected nearly fifty years.

During this period he was associated with various partners, including C. Nelson, E. Hall, O. Belden, James H. Horton and others, besides, at times, conducting the business alone. He suffered by the fire of in common with other business men of Chicago, but promptly resumed business and, within the next two or three years, had erected business blocks, successively, on Lake and Randolph Streets, but retired from business in Died in Chicago, May 10, He engaged in journalism at Rochester, Minn.

Paul Pioneer Press. Blakely was President of the Blakely Printing Company, of Chicago, also conducting a large printing business in New York, which was his residence. This settlement, of which the present town of Marine first called Madison was the outcome, took its name from the fact that several of the early settlers, like Captain Blakeman, were sea-faring men. Captain Blakeman became a prominent citizen and represented Madison County in the lower branch of the Third and Fourth General Assemblies and , in the former being one of the opponents of the pro-slavery amendment of the Constitution.

In he assumed the Presidency of Knox College at Galesburg, remaining until , during his connection with that institution doing much to increase its capacity and resources. It is a shipping point for the grain grown in the surrounding country, and has a grain elevator and steam flour and saw mills.

It also has banks, one weekly newspaper and several churches. Daniel Brainard in founding Rush Medical College at Chicago, for a time filling three chairs in that institution; also, for a time, occupied the chair of Chemistry and Natural Philosophy in Northwestern University. Died, Dec. John Blatchford, was born at Stillwater, N. He prepared for college at Lansingburg Academy. New York, and at Marion College, Mo. After graduating, he was employed for several years in the law offices of his uncles, R.

Blatchford, New York. For considerations of health he returned to the West, and, in , engaged in business for himself as a lead manufacturer in St. After a few years the firm was dissolved, Mr. Blatchford taking the Chicago business, which has continued as E. While Mr. Blatchford has invariably declined political offices, he has been recognized as a staunch Republican, and the services of few men have been in more frequent request for positions of trust in connection with educational and benevolent enterprises.

Williams, of Chicago. In the giving of time and money for Christian, educational and benevolent enterprises, he has been conspicuous for his generosity, and noted for his valuable counsel and executive ability in carrying these enterprises to success. He finished his theological course at Princeton, N. In he came to the West, spending the following winter at Jacksonville, Ill.

His death occurred in St. Louis, April 8, The churches he served testified strongly to Dr. Then, having studied theology, he served for several years as rector of Episcopal churches in Ohio. In he settled at Springfield, Ill. Later he became Professor of Mathematics, first in the University of Mississippi, and in the University of Virginia. Later he became a minister of the Methodist Church.

He gained considerable reputation for eloquence during his residence in Illinois, and was the author of a number of works on religious and political subjects, the latter maintaining the right of secession; was a man of recognized ability, but lacked stability of character. Died at Alexandria, Va. At the age of 10 years he removed with his parents to Illinois, where he attended the district schools, later returning to Amherst to spend a year at the Academy.

Returning home, he spent the years in teaching and surveying. In he began the study of law at Chicago, being admitted to the bar in , and beginning practice at Waukegan, Ill. In he was elected to the lower house of the Legislature from Lake County, as an anti-slavery candidate, and, in , to the State Senate, in the latter serving four years. Of the second named road he was one of the projectors, procuring its charter, and being identified with it in the several capacities of Attorney, Director and President.

This position he continued to occupy for twenty-two years, resigning it in to accept an appointment by President Cleveland as one of the counsel for the United States before the Behring Sea Arbitrators at Paris, bis last official service. Died Feb. Besides car shops and repair works employing some 2, hands, there are manufactories of stoves, furnaces, plows, flour, etc.

Nurseries are numerous in the vicinity and horse breeding receives muoh attention. The city is the seat of Illinois Wesleyan University, has fine public schools, several newspapers two published daily , besides educational and other publications. The business section suffered a disastrous fire in , but has been rebuilt more substantially than before.

Although not formally called as such, this was the first Republican State Convention held in Illinois, out of which grew a permanent Republican organization in the State. The Bloomington Convention of met in accordance with a call issued by a State Central Committee appointed by the Convention of Anti-Nebraska editors held at Decatur on February 22, See Anti-Nebraska Editorial Convention.

The Convention met on May 29, , the date designated by the Editorial Convention at Decatur, but was rather in the nature of a mass than a delegate convention, as party organizations existed in few counties of the State at that time. Consequently representation was very unequal and followed no systematic rule. Out of one hundred counties into which the State was then divided, only seventy were represented by delegates, ranging from one to twenty-five each, leaving thirty counties embracing nearly the whole of the southern part of the State entirely unrepresented.

Lee County had the largest representation twenty-five , Morgan County the home of Richard Yates coming next with twenty delegates, while Cook County had seventeen and Sangamon had five. The whole number of delegates, as shown by the contemporaneous record, was Browning, Richard Yates, John M. Palmer, Owen Lovejoy, Norman B. Judd, Burton C. Cook and others who afterwards became prominent in State politics. Ray and Charles L. The temporary organization was effected with Archibald Williams of Adams County in the chair, followed by the election of John M.

Palmer of Macoupin, as Permanent President. The other officers were: Vice-Presidents — John A. Bryant of Bureau; A. Johns of Macon; D. Marshall of Coles; J. Ruggles of Mason; G. Parks of Will, and John Clark of Schuyler. Secretaries — Henry S. Baker of Madison; Charles L. Hanna of Randolph. A State ticket was put in nomination consisting of William H. Bissell for Governor by acclamation ; Francis A.

Powell of Peoria, for Superintendent of Public Instruction.

Popular cities

Hoffman, having been found ineligible by lack of residence after the date of naturalization, withdrew, and his place was subsequently filled by the nomination of John Wood of Quincy. The platform adopted was outspoken in its pledges of unswerving loyalty to the Union and opposition to the extension of slavery into new territory. A delegation was appointed to the National Convention to be held in Philadelphia on June 17, following, and a State Central Committee was named to conduct the State campaign, consisting of James C.

Cook of La Salle, and Charles H. Ray and Norman B. Judd of Cook. The principal speakers of the occasion, before the convention or in popular meetings held while the members were present in Bloomington, included the names of O. Cook, Richard Yates, the venerable John Dixon, founder of the city bearing his name, and Governor Reeder of Pennsylvania, who had been Territorial Governor of Kansas by appointment of President Pierce, but had refused to carry out the policy of the administration for making Kansas a slave State. None of the speeches were fully reported, but that of Mr. John L.

For an hour and a half he Mr. Lincoln held the assemblage spellbound by the power of his argument, the intense irony of his invective, and the deep earnestness and fervid brilliancy of his eloquence. When he concluded, the audience sprang to their feet and cheer after cheer told how deeply their hearts had been touched and their souls warmed up to a generous enthusiasm.

It has a high school, churches and two newspapers, besides brick, smelting and oil works. Population , ; , , , ; , Other public positions held by Dr. Boal have been those of Senator in the Fourteenth and Fifteenth General Assemblies , Representative in the Nineteenth and Twentieth , and Trustee of the Institution for the Deaf and Dumb at Jacksonville, remaining in the latter position seventeen years under the successive administrations of Governors Bissell, Yates, Oglesby, Palmer and Beveridge — the last five years of his service being President of the Board.

He was also President of the State Medical Board in Boal continued to practice at Peoria until about , when he retired, and, in , returned to Lacon to reside with his daughter, the widow of the late Colonel Greenbury L. Fort, for eight years Representative in Congress from the Eighth District.

Died June 12, It is appointed by the Executive and is composed of three members not more than two of whom can belong to the same political party , one of whom must be an employer of labor and one a member of some labor organization. The term of office for the members first named was fixed at two years; after March 1, , it became three years, one member retiring annually.

When a controversy arises between an individual, firm or corporation employing not less than twenty-five persons, and his or its employes, application may be made by the aggrieved party to the Board for an inquiry into the nature of the disagreement, or both parties may unite in the submission of a case. The Board is required to visit the locality, carefully investigate the cause of the dispute and render a decision as soon as practicable, the same to be at once made public. If the application be filed by the employer, it must be accompanied by a stipulation to continue in business, and order no lock-out for the space of three weeks-after its date.

In like manner, complaining employes must promise to continue peacefully at work, under existing conditions, for a like period. The Board is granted power to send for persons and papers and to administer oaths to witnesses. In case the Board shall learn that a disagreement exists between employes and an employer having less than twenty-five persons in his employ, and that a strike or lock-out is seriously threatened, it is made the duty of the body to put itself into communication with both employer and employes and endeavor to effect an amicable settlement between them by mediation.

The absence of any provision in the law prescribing penalties for its violation leaves the observance of the law, in its present form, dependent upon the voluntary action of the parties interested. By act of the General Assembly, passed June 15, , the Governor was authorized to appoint a State Board of Administration, with power to assume control of the State charitable institutions which had been under supervision of the Board of Public Charities since The first members of the new Board, with periods for which they were appointed, were: L.

Burroughs ; James L. Greene and Frank D. Whipp , their successors being appointive for terms of six years each. They are charged with the duty of inspecting, investigating and licensing all institutions where persons are under treatment for mental or nervous diseases; have power of appointment or removal of superintendents or managers of the same; are authorized to inspect county jails, city prisons and houses of correction, to examine sanitary conditions and regulate the admission of patients to the same; and to this end it is required that each State institution under their supervision shall be visited at least once per quarter by some member of the Board.

Charles School for Boys. This commission serves without compensation, except for traveling expenses while on duty, is required to investigate the whole system of State charitable institutions, examine into their condition and management and report their findings and recommendations to the Governor. The second is a system of Boards of Visitors, each Board consisting of three members for each State charitable institution, and appointive under the same conditions as members of the Charities Commission, for a term of six years. These Boards are required to make an inspection of the institu — tions under their supervision, for this purpose a majority of each Board, at least once each quarter, visiting such institutions as have the whole State for a district, in other cases at least once a month, and report thereon to the Charities Commission.

All the employes of the Board of Administration, the Charities Commission and the Psychopathic Institute, except the managing officers, are placed under the civil service law. While in the service he participated in some of the most important battles in Virginia, and was once wounded and once captured. In he located in Ford County, Ill.

At the session of he was chosen President pro tem. Baker, his term to continue until After graduating he taught in academics at Limerick, Me. In he went into the service of the Sanitary Commission in the Department of the Gulf, remaining until the close of the war; was also ordained Chaplain of a colored regiment, but was not regularly mustered in. After the close of the war he was employed as Superintendent of Schools at Griggsville, Ill.

He afterwards organized the township high school at Ottawa, remaining there five years, after which, in , he organized and took charge of the township high school at Evanston, where he has since been employed in his profession as a teacher. He did a great deal of institute work, both in Illinois and Iowa, and was known somewhat as a tariff reformer. Bond served several terms in the Chicago City Council, was Republican Presidential Elector in , and served two terms in the General Assembly Died April 15, He served as a member of the first Territorial Legislature of Indiana Territory and was the first Delegate from the Territory of Illinois in Congress, serving from to In the latter year he was appointed Receiver of Public Moneys; he also held a commission as Captain in the War of On the admission of the State, in , he was elected Governor, and occupied the executive chair until Died at Kaskaskia, April 13, Clair County then comprehending all Illinois to the Territorial Legislature of Northwest Territory, in , and, in , to the Legislative Council of the newly organized Territory of Indiana.

Louis, having an area of square miles and a population of 17, Settlement was slow, in there being scarcely twenty-five log cabins in the county. The county-seat is Greenville, where the first cabin was erected in by George Davidson. The county was organized in , and named in honor of Gov. Shadrach Bond. Its original limits included the present counties of Clinton, Fayette and Montgomery. The first court was held at Perryville, and, in May, Judge Jesse B. The first court house was erected at Greenville in The county contains good timber and farming lands, and at some points, coal is found near the surface.

Among the reforms which he advocated were the constitutional prohibition of special legislation; an extension of equity practice to bankruptcy and other law proceedings; civil service pensions; State Boards of labor and capital, etc. Bonney contributed largely to the success of that very interesting and important feature of the great Columbian Exposition.

Died Aug. Died February Its surface is chiefly rolling prairie, and the principal products are oats and corn. Later after the Pottawattomies had evacuated the country , came the Shattuck brothers. Maria Hollenbeck and Mrs. Whiting, H. Walker, and the Neeley and Mahoney families. The first frame house in the county was erected by S. Doty and stood for fifty years in the village of Belvidere on the north side of the Kishwaukee River.

The county-seat Belvidere was platted in , and an academy built soon after. The first Protestant church was a Baptist society under the pastorate of Rev. John A. Logan to the United States Senate for the last time. At a special election held in the Sixth Illinois District in November, , he was elected Representative in Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the sudden death of his predecessor, Congressman Edward D. Cooke, and at the regular election of was re-elected to the same position, receiving a plurality of 1, over his Democratic competitor and a majority of over all.

He then became the head of the Union Foundry Works, which having been consolidated with the Pullman Car Works in , he retired, organizing the Bouton Foundry Company. Bouton was a Republican, was Commissioner of Public Works for the city of Chicago two terms before the Civil War, and served as Assistant Quartermaster in the Eighty-eighth Illinois Infantry from until after the battle of Chickamauga. Died April 3, In he abandoned his practice to enlist in the Seventeenth Illinois Infantry, in which he held the position of Captain. At the close of the war he returned to his home at Lewistown, and, in , was elected State Senator and re-elected at the expiration of his term in , serving in the Twenty-fifth, Twenty-sixth and Twenty-seventh General Assemblies.

Died, at Lewistown, May 28, Coal mining is the principal industry. The town has two banks, two churches and good public schools. He removed to Illinois early in life, and was the first postmaster in Washington County at Covington , the first school-teacher and the first Circuit and County Clerk and Recorder.

At the time of his death he was Probate and County Judge. Died at Nashville, Ill. In they emigrated to Jacksonville, Ill. His first schooling was obtained in a country log-schoolhouse, but, later, he attended the Wilson Academy in Chicago, where he had Judge Lorenzo Sawyer for an instructor. He also took a course in Knox College at Galesburg, then a manual-labor school, supporting himself by working in a wagon and plow shop, sawing wood, etc.

He was admitted to the bar there, but after a stay of less than two years in Memphis, returned to Chicago and began practice. In he was elected County Judge of Cook County, and re-elected four years later, but declined a re-election in The first half of his term occurring during the progress of the Civil War, he had the opportunity of rendering some vigorous decisions which won for him the reputation of a man of courage and inflexible independence, as well as an incorruptible champion of justice.

In he was elected to the lower branch of the Twenty-eighth General Assembly from Cook County, and re-elected in He was again a candidate in , and by many believed to have been honestly elected, though his opponent received the certificate. He made a contest for the seat, and the majority of the Committee on Elections reported in his favor; but he was defeated through the treachery and suspected corruption of a professed political friend.

He is the author of the law making women eligible to school offices in Illinois and allowing them to become Notaries Public, and had always been a champion for equal rights for women in the professions and as citizens. In infancy she was brought to Portage, N. She attended school in Kenosha, Wis. After passing a most creditable examination, application was made for her admission to the bar in , but denied in an elaborate decision rendered by Judge C. Lawrence of the Supreme Court of the State, on the sole ground of sex, as was also done by the Supreme Court of the United States in , on the latter occasion Chief Justice Chase dissenting.

She was finally admitted to the bar on March 28, , and was the first lady member of the State Bar Association. Although much before the public during the latter years of her life, she never lost the refinement and graces which belong to a true woman. Died, at her home in Chicago, Feb. It has a bank and a weekly paper. Smith, a prominent and able lawyer of Jacksonville, and was admitted to the bar in January, 18G0, soon after establishing himself in practice at Petersburg, Menard County, where he continued to reside. Branson was appointed Register in Bankruptcy for the Springfield District — a position which he held thirteen years.

He was also elected Representative in the General Assembly in , by re-election in serving four years in the stormy Twenty-eighth and Twenty-ninth General Assemblies; was a Delegate from Illinois to the National Republican Convention of , and served for several years most efficiently as a Trustee of the State Institution for the Blind at Jacksonville, part of the time as President of the Board. Politically a conservative Republican, and in no sense an office-seeker, the official positions assigned to him came unsought and in recognition of his fitness and qualifications.

In he opened a law office in Springfield, Ill. In he was appointed to revise the statutes of the State. In he entered the service as Major of the Twenty-ninth Illinois Volunteers, taking part in a number of the early battles, including Fort Donelson and Shiloh; was promoted to a colonelcy for meritorious conduct at the latter, and for a time served as Adjutant-General on the staff of General McClernand; was promoted Brigadier-General in September, , at the close of the war receiving the brevet rank of Major-General.

Died, in Kansas City, Feb. Railway, 39 miles east of St. Louis; has coal mines, water system, bank and weekly newspaper. Owing to a certain sensitiveness about his age in his later years, it has been exceedingly difficult to secure authentic data on the subject; but his arrival at Kaskaskia in , after graduating at Union College, and his admission to the bar in , have induced many to believe that the date of his birth should be placed somewhat earlier.

He was related to some of the most prominent families in New York, including the Livingstons and the Morses, and, after his arrival at Kaskaskia, began the study of law with his friend Elias Kent Kane, afterwards United States Senator. Meanwhile, having served as Postmaster at Kaskaskia, he became Assistant Secretary of State, and, in December, , superintended the removal of the archives of that office to Vandalia, the new State capital. Later he was appointed Prosecuting Attorney, serving in that position from till , when he became United States District Attorney for Illinois.

Young, defeating Stephen A. Douglas in the first race of the latter for the office. While in the Senate he served as Chairman of the Committee on Public Lands, and was one of the first to suggest the construction of a transcontinental railway to the Pacific. He was also one of the originators and active promoters in Congress of the Illinois Central Railroad enterprise.

He was Speaker of the Illinois House of Representatives in ; again became Circuit Judge in and returned to the Supreme bench in and served more than one term as Chief Justice, the last being in His home during most of his public life in Illinois was at Carlyle. His death occurred at Pinckneyville, June 28, He was successively a member of the Baden Chamber of Deputies and of the Frankfort Parliament, and always a leader of the revolutionist party.

In he became President of the Provisional Republican Government of Baden, but was, before long, forced to find an asylum in the United States. He first settled in Kalamazoo County, Mich. Died, in Chicago, Sept. Railroad, 14 miles west of Vincennes, Ind. It is now the center of the large slaughtering and packing industry. It has one weekly paper and a bank. After completing his course he served as pastor of some of the most prominent Methodist churches in Chicago, his last charge in the State being at Evanston.

In he was transferred to Washington City, becoming pastor of the Metropolitan M. Church, attended by President McKinley Dr. Bristol is an author of some repute and an orator of recognized ability. Having been admitted to the bar, he practiced for a time at Pekin, but, in , returned to Springfield, where he spent the remainder of his life.

Other offices held by him included those of County Judge and Mayor of the city of Springfield, to which last position he was twice elected and again in Judge Broadwell was one of the most genial of men, popular, high-minded and honorable in all his dealings. Died, in Springfield, Feb. After preaching at Collinsville, Belleville and other points, Mr. Although finally compelled to abandon this, he continued teaching with some interruptions to within a few years of his death, which occurred in He was one of the Trustees of Illinois College from its foundation up to his death.

For five years after graduating he was a teacher, and settled in Chicago in There he first engaged in bookselling, but later embarked in journalism. In , in connection with John L. Bross retaining his connection with the new concern. He was always an ardent free-soiler, and a firm believer in the great future of Chicago and the Northwest. He was an enthusiastic Republican, and, in and , served as an effective campaign orator.

In he was the successful nominee of his party for Lieutenant-Governor. This was his only official position outside of a membership in the Chicago Common Council in As a presiding officer, he was dignified yet affable, and his impartiality was shown by the fact that no appeals were taken from his decisions. After quitting public life he devoted much time to literary pursuits, delivering lectures in various parts of the country.